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57 Dems Have No Business Asking Anyone Why They Don’t Vote

57 Dems Have No Business Asking Anyone Why They Don’t Vote

57 Democrats. “Protesters I’ve talked to, they’re not interested in politics, they don’t think that it works for them and they don’t think they should be part of the system.  I think while we talk about candidate incubators and when we talk about putting people in office, I think we have a generation who doesn’t believe in that.  We have to figure out what that means,” said reporter Yamiche Alcindor of USAToday on NewsOneNow on November 25.

Alcindor has been covering Ferguson for months. 

cromFor anyone in the Democratic Party who scratches their head every two years and wonders why people don’t vote: Consider the votes of 57 Democrats last Thursday on the “cromnibus.”   

Here we have a budget bill of $1.1 trillion.  What’s in it? Cuts in Pell Grants, a middle-finger-to-consumers in the form of a rollback to Dodd-Frank, a gift to big oil, zero of the $263 million in police body cameras asked for by the President, and a cut to pensions.  Why shouldn’t turnout be the worst in 72 years?

And who voted for it? Who allowed it to pass? Who arranged phone calls featuring cabinet officials to convince people to support it? That would be top Democrats.  Those top Democrats would include President Obama, Joe Biden, Steny Hoyer, George Miller, DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Jim Clyburn.

If you represented a district that’s 62% Black with an average income of $26,000, what would you be doing voting for a bill that sends billions overseas that has nothing to do with your constituents.  Why would you be voting for a Dodd-Frank rollback you knew was put in place after a catastrophic economic downturn that hit your district in particular?

“We got to stand up for principle at some point or they are going to kick us even more when they have a bigger majority,” said Rep. Peter DeFazio.  At what point Democrats “stand up for principle” is anyone’s guess.

In the meantime no one should wonder why voters don’t think “politics works for them” and turnout remains low.